Orbit-shifting innovation happens when an area that needs transformation meets an innovator with the will and the desire to create, and not follow history. At the heart of an Orbit-shifting innovation is the breakthrough that creates a new orbit and achieves a transformative impact.

Making innovation the transforming agent for the organizations and the society: this is the mission that has inspired us, over the last 25 years, to take on over 250 Orbit-shifting innovation challenges across industries, cultures and countries.

Erehwon brings first-hand insight into the dynamics of making an 'Orbit-shifting innovations happen'. It is not theoretical; it is based on insights drawn from 25 years of working and research with organizations in making Orbit-shifting innovation happen. It is not an academic but a practitioner's point of view.

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It draws from three powerful
insight sources:

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Cutting - edge insights drawn from over 250 Orbit-shifting innovation missions that we have led and facilitated. These missions are spread across industries and sectors, including telecom, IT, FMCG, energy, banking, and even social enterprises and public services.

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Deep insight into leadership mindsets that spur or limit innovation. This is a result of our Gravity Diagnostics and strategic transformational interventions with top leadership teams from across 150 organizations.

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Orbit-shifting innovation is also a result of firsthand research and insight into Orbit-shifting innovations across sectors. Our focused and ongoing research has identified over 100 Orbit-shifters and what differentiates them.

The Erehwon approach hones in on the question: 'What are the real dynamics of executing an Orbit-shifting innovation with as much focus as it takes to conceive it?' It is not mechanistic; it brings alive the human endeavor intrinsic to innovation. It illustrates the excitement and the pains of making Orbit-shifting innovation happen. It also defines a framework to navigate innovation; a framework that takes into account that innovation is inherently about the unknown, and therefore cannot be managed but has to be steered.